News

Print this page
30.09.2017. New Valdai report

The report is prepared due to series of investigations conducted in 2016-2017 and situational analysis on Pivot to the East which took place on February 20, 2017.

 

The current stage of Russia’s turn
to the East was conceived in the latter half
of the 2000s as a somewhat late response
to Asia’s economic rise, which opened many new
development opportunities for Russia, primarily its
eastern regions. Building on this potential, parts
of Russia to the east of the Urals and its Far East
could become national development and growth
drivers. This would be a marked shift from the past,
when these territories were considered a burden
inherited from the Russian Empire or served as
a rear base in Russia’s standoff with the West and
occasionally as a frontline in its rivalry with Japan
or China. The inevitable slowdown of the European
economy, traditionally Russia’s main partner,
and the increasingly complicated relations with
Europe and the West as a whole was another way
of justifying the expediency of this turn.

The current stage of Russia’s pivot to the East was conceived in the latter half of the 2000s as a somewhat late response to Asia’s economic rise, which opened many new development opportunities for Russia, primarily its eastern regions. Building on this potential, parts of Russia to the East of the Urals and its Far East could become national development and growth drivers. This would be a marked shift from the past, when these territories were considered a burden inherited from the Russian Empire or served as a rear base in Russia’s standoff with the West and occasionally as a frontline in its rivalry with Japan or China. The inevitable slowdown of the European economy, traditionally Russia’s main partner, and the increasingly complicated relations with Europe and the West as a whole was another way of justifying the expediency of this turn.

 

Towards the Great Ocean - 5