Publications

24.01.2013. West's Decline Will Play a Mean Trick on Russia
After the collapse of the Soviet Union, there was a thaw in many issues that had been frozen during the Cold War. The two countries dictated terms to states and societies, the Soviet Union generally taking a more heavy-handed approach, while the U.S. typically acted with more finesse. One example is when U.S. and Soviet leaders sealed a nuclear nonproliferation agreement that accepted their own nuclear arsenals but denied other states the same right.   There was also a...

23.01.2013. A Third “Unfreezing”
The collapse of communism in the 1990s was followed by what is commonly referred to as the “unfreezing” of numerous conflicts that had been “frozen” by structural confrontation between the Soviet Union and the United States, which at that time represented the East and the West. The external limits for activities of states and societies were dictated by the Soviet Union (strictly) and by the United States (somewhat milder), and sometimes by both of them, for...

27.12.2012. Keeping the Powder Dry
Why Russia Should Build Up Its Military Might Even in a Favorable Foreign Environment Sergei Karaganov is Honorary Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy and Dean of the School of World Economics and World Politics at the National Research University–Higher School of Economics. Resume With the global situation and Russia’s development vector as they are, the policy of military build-up is inevitable. The question is how and at what...

18.10.2012. How the G20 Can Save the World
For centuries, leading liberal thinkers have been calling for a world government to increase global order and security. Yet no such system exists, and most of the institutions that have been set up for that purpose have grown weaker over the past two decades. The inherent contradiction between globalization and an increasingly multipolar world has created a vacuum of governance that grows larger as outdated global...

16.10.2012. Contradiction of Contradictions
A Contradiction Between the Globalization of the World and the Deglobalization of Governance Is Creating a Vacuum of Governability   In today’s world, woven of contradictions, there is one fundamental contradiction. I would call it a “contradiction of contradictions”. For the first time in history, the world has become one integrated place. The present and the future of countries and nations determine problems that are predominantly...

12.09.2012. Security Strategy: Why Arms?
Russia has embarked on a military buildup path. The external military threat is record low. But this policy will be continued in this or other form. It fits in with the new international realities and agrees with the internal logic of the country’s development. The question is how to optimize it. We, the country’s people and (it looks like) its leaders, too, do not take the trouble to explain to ourselves and, possibly, we do not even know why we need military strength...

11.09.2012. Russia in the World of Ideas and Images
Persistent downgrading of a country eventually produces a persistent image of a loser nation among its citizens – with the ensuing costs paid by future generations. It is quite obvious now that Russia will have – by virtue of destiny or plight – to act as an independent center of power in the coming years. Russia’s strategic solitude (hopefully, shared with its friends in the Eurasian Union), which will last ten or so years in the least, requires making an...

13.07.2012. Europe: Good News
The European Union is adapting to a new reality – slowly but surely   I will not mislead the reader: this article is not bringing any news about the Greek debt crisis settlement or preventing such in Spain, Portugal, Ireland or Italy. Nor does it address the establishment of a single political governance of the eurozone’s economy and finance, whose absence made the single currency predictably ineffective. Part of the countries could use its...

18.06.2012. Echo of an Impending War
The macro changes in the world economy and politics, developments in the Greater Middle East, and actions (or inaction) by old great powers make further plunging of the region into conflicts almost inevitable. I am a bit surprised that the press keeps ignoring the growing probability of a big war, or a series of wars, in the Middle East. Observers and analysts, following in the footsteps of the Western mass media from which they primarily get their information, discuss one crisis...

17.05.2012. Russia Needs One More Capital – in Siberia
If Peter the Great lived now, he would surely build the capital not in the Baltic region, but at the Pacific Ocean. For over a year, a serious discussion about Russia’s future was drowned in the election debates. Now that the election season, unusually long and intensive, is over, it would be appropriate to address strategic issues again. In one of them I have been keenly interested for 15 years and I have closely studied it for four. The issue surfaced rather...

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